Shipping Animals

Shipping live animals take some thought and planning. To summarize, get a check-up and clearance to ship from a veterinarian, make sure you understand the laws and regulation at the final destination in particular, crate-train the puppy before shipping, and follow specific kennel preparation measures, to ensure your puppy arrives at his/her new home safe and healthy.

 

Take into account the puppy’s health.

 

Transportation can be stressful. See a veterinarian before shipping your puppy. The dog will need a check up to avoid any unpleasant surprises. Tell the vet that the puppy is going to be shipped, and ask that they give you a letter that states that the puppy is suited for shipping. Listen to the veterinarian’s advice: if the vet says the dog is too weak, sick, or otherwise not fit to be shipped, don’t do it. If you are a breeder, try to find a local loving home, and explain to any potential buyer that you can provide them with another puppy. It’s better for the puppy to live and thrive, than to take unnecessary risks that can leave the puppy very sick or worse, and their new family stressed out.

 

Take into account the length of the trip, and the animal shipping laws.

 

If your puppy is travelling internationally, he/she will be shipped as cargo on an airplane – this means spending a long time in a kennel. He/she will need to be trained for this, and to consider to the crate to be a safe place.

 

If you are shipping the puppy internationally, make sure you know what each country requires, as some countries do not permit international shipping of live animals, and others mandate an extended quarantine. Other places only allow certain types of pets across the border. Do your research when it comes to animal transport laws in different nations.

 

Get the right kind of kennel, and prepare it according to these guidelines.

 

Whether the puppy is traveling by air or ground transportation, the kennel construction and preparation is essential. This is what will keep the puppy safe through his/er journey, to join his/her new family without health problems or trauma. One essential part of this is the crate training; the puppy needs to know how to be in the kennel and feel safe. Other things to take into account are:

 

Size: The kennel must be large enough for the puppy sit down, lie down, and turn around with some room to spare. Note: If the puppy is pug-nosed, size up the kennel so he/she has no trouble breathing.

 

Materials: The kennel should be sturdy, and made of rigid material (think metal, hard plastic, or wood). If the pet is not traveling by airplane, and instead is with a person (like in a car), it is fine if the kennel has a soft top. Otherwise, make sure the entire kennel is made of unyielding material. It’s best to include extra bolts (the bolts should be very sturdy) in case there is any damage in transport.

 

For a safe and happy trip, the kennel should have:

    *  No lock, but a strong latch.

    *  Handles so it can be carried without anyone having to touch the puppy.

    *  Either removable wheels or no wheels at all.

    *  Clear labeling: “LIVE ANIMAL” and “THIS SIDE UP” with arrows.

    *  A current picture of the puppy, the puppy’s names, and handling instructions.

    * Paper or cloth bedding inside.

    * Two dishes, and two servings of food (bagged) and water (bottled) attached to the door, with feeding instructions.

Shipping live animals take some thought and planning. To summarize, get a check-up and clearance to ship from a veterinarian, make sure you understand the laws and regulation at the final destination in particular, crate-train the puppy before shipping, and follow specific kennel preparation measures, to ensure your puppy arrives at his/her new home safe and healthy.

 

Take into account the puppy’s health.

 

Transportation can be stressful. See a veterinarian before shipping your puppy. The dog will need a check up to avoid any unpleasant surprises. Tell the vet that the puppy is going to be shipped, and ask that they give you a letter that states that the puppy is suited for shipping. Listen to the veterinarian’s advice: if the vet says the dog is too weak, sick, or otherwise not fit to be shipped, don’t do it. If you are a breeder, try to find a local loving home, and explain to any potential buyer that you can provide them with another puppy. It’s better for the puppy to live and thrive, than to take unnecessary risks that can leave the puppy very sick or worse, and their new family stressed out.

 

Take into account the length of the trip, and the animal shipping laws.

 

If your puppy is travelling internationally, he/she will be shipped as cargo on an airplane – this means spending a long time in a kennel. He/she will need to be trained for this, and to consider to the crate to be a safe place.

 

If you are shipping the puppy internationally, make sure you know what each country requires, as some countries do not permit international shipping of live animals, and others mandate an extended quarantine. Other places only allow certain types of pets across the border. Do your research when it comes to animal transport laws in different nations.

 

Get the right kind of kennel, and prepare it according to these guidelines.

 

Whether the puppy is traveling by air or ground transportation, the kennel construction and preparation is essential. This is what will keep the puppy safe through his/er journey, to join his/her new family without health problems or trauma. One essential part of this is the crate training; the puppy needs to know how to be in the kennel and feel safe. Other things to take into account are:

 

Size: The kennel must be large enough for the puppy sit down, lie down, and turn around with some room to spare. Note: If the puppy is pug-nosed, size up the kennel so he/she has no trouble breathing.

 

Materials: The kennel should be sturdy, and made of rigid material (think metal, hard plastic, or wood). If the pet is not traveling by airplane, and instead is with a person (like in a car), it is fine if the kennel has a soft top. Otherwise, make sure the entire kennel is made of unyielding material. It’s best to include extra bolts (the bolts should be very sturdy) in case there is any damage in transport.

 

For a safe and happy trip, the kennel should have:

    *  No lock, but a strong latch

    *  Handles so it can be carried without anyone having to touch the puppy.

    * Either removable wheels or no wheels at all.

    * Clear labeling: “LIVE ANIMAL” and “THIS SIDE UP” with arrows.

    * A current picture of the puppy, the puppy’s names, and handling instructions.

    * Paper or cloth bedding inside.

    *  Two dishes, and two servings of food (bagged) and water (bottled) attached to the door, with feeding instructions.

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